Monthly Archives: September 2016

Know More About Insurance in the Gig Economy

There are plenty of reasons to become a freelancer. The new “gig economy” is one where people are opting out of being on a company’s payroll. Instead, they’re forming their own company and taking contract jobs. There’s plenty to like about such an arrangement. There’s often more flexibility in your schedule and although you go from a couple of bosses to often many, you get to pick who you work with. Owning your own business can also be financially lucrative as you gain a reputation for dependability and quality work.

But as we’ve been exploring in our gig economy series, there’s a lot to consider before quitting your job and going freelance. We looked at the tax implications—the fact that you no longer have an employer paying a portion of your Medicare and Social Security taxes. That represents a lot of money.

Next, we looked at retirement. You no longer have a 401(k) that your company is paying into on your behalf. Retirement planning is now a solo endeavor so your pricing has to be high enough that you can contribute to a retirement account each month.

There’s one other major piece of freelancing you have to take into account—insurance. When you were an employee for another company, there were insurances in place to protect you and the company you worked for, but as a freelancer, it all falls on you.

First, and most important, is health insurance. Many freelancers get insurance through their spouse who remains on a company’s payroll—something for no other purpose than health insurance. If not, you can get coverage through the health insurance marketplace or through private companies. One word of warning: trying to save money by purchasing only catastrophic coverage isn’t in your best interest, especially if you have a family. Plan on getting a better plan. A 2016 analysis of healthcare costs found that a silver plan for a 40 year old non-smoker making about $30,000 cost $208 per month after the tax credit. But this is only the individual rate. Providing coverage for a family will be significantly higher. Before leaving your job, figure out your insurance costs. Sometimes health insurance alone makes freelancing as your sole source of income impossible until the business grows significantly.

Life Insurance

If you were to pass away, would your family quickly fall into a state of financial emergency? If the answer is yes, you need life insurance. Consider term life rather than universal. There are a lot of opinions out there but many experts agree that cash value life insurance policies aren’t efficient investment vehicles for retirement planning.

Disability Insurance

What happens if you’re temporarily disabled for an extended period or permanently unable to work? Where will your income come from? You might qualify for disability and get a monthly amount from Social Security but that’s not likely to support your family the way you were as a freelancer. It won’t be long until you need to consider disability insurance. Prices vary depending on your age, your health and your habits—whether you smoke, for example, but plan on paying 1% to 3% of your annual salary.

Liability Insurance

There are very few businesses where making a mistake doesn’t expose you to a potential lawsuit. That’s why you need business liability insurance. Contrary to some people’s beliefs, home based businesses often aren’t covered under the owner’s residential home owner’s insurance policy. General liability policies will cover you up to a certain amount for injuries customer might sustain while on your property, copyright violations, or alcohol-related injuries if your business deals with alcohol. Some business might need a commercial policy that ups the maximum payout. Because each business has different needs, it’s hard to put an average price on this type of insurance but a sole proprietor will likely pay between $50 and $100 per month.

Business Auto Insurance

If you’re a sole proprietor who doesn’t run a delivery business or something else that centers around their car, normal auto insurance might be enough but if you have employees or use your vehicle for commercial intent, you will probably need business auto insurance. Business auto insurance works a lot like the auto insurance policy you already know. Talk to an agent. They will tell you if you need business auto insurance and how much.

Industry Specific Insurance

Doctors have malpractice insurance, financial advisers have errors and omissions insurance, and many other businesses have insurances specific to their industry that must be in place. Once you hire employees you will likely need worker’s compensation insurance as well. As you grow and evolve, ask a trusted agent or your industry trade group what’s required.

Start a Business with No Money

You have a dream but no money to put toward the dream. That’s not uncommon among entrepreneurs. Don’t let the lack of money deter you from a business you know other people would find benefit from. Here are a few ideas of how to get your business off the ground with no money.

1. Some are Easier Than Others

If you don’t have any startup capital, service-based businesses are perfect. Product based businesses require you to purchase and then resell. Service-based businesses like consulting, advising, or things like content creation or web design, only need equipment you probably already have.

2. Get Creative with How You Raise Funds

Consider the story of how Outbox Systems started. The founders had a dream of connecting two software applications together but didn’t have the money to build it. Instead, they worked out a deal with another company where they would build a similar product for a discounted rate yet retain the rights to sell the product to others. That’s creative financing. How can you get creative with how you raise money?

3. Sweat Equity is Free

Starting a business is hard. It’s not comfortable. Expect long days, a lot of hard conversations, and plenty of people telling you it won’t work. You don’t have the money to hire people to do tasks like cold calling and door to door sales so you have to take on the task. If you commit to being the person that does just about everything in the beginning, startup costs are much lower.

4. Creative Fundraising – Part 2

Yes, there’s friends and family but today we have crowdfunding, local and national incubators, accelerators, and microfinancing. If you don’t know what these are, do some Googling and learn about them. Look for communities of investors in your area and tell others about your business. There’s plenty of funding that doesn’t involve banks and credit cards.

5. Start Simple

Your dream might include a pretty big business offering a wide variety of products and services but for now, keep it simple. Sell a single product or service. Build your customer base and later branch out into other products and services.

One of the most expensive parts of running a business is acquiring customers. If you gain their trust with one product or service now, selling something else later is much easier.

6. Start as a Hobby

At some point you’ll have to quit your day job but that day isn’t today. Hobby businesses often come from the person’s love of something. Maybe you have a corporate job during the day but you love to bake when you come home. Start with people you know and allow your network to grow from there. Your marketing costs are zero and you still have money coming in from your day job.

7. Work for Somebody Else

Although they may not admit it, most business owners became entrepreneurs thinking they knew more than what they did. In fact, many businesses fail because the person was ill-equipped to build a successful business.

Before you start your own business, work or intern with somebody in the business already. The experience you gain will allow you to start your business knowing what you truly need to spend money on and what you don’t. You’ll also gain insider knowledge of the industry and possibly a healthy customer list from the beginning.

8. Use Free Services

The Internet is full of high quality services you can use for free. Mailchimp is a powerful e-mail marketing platform that’s free for the first 2,000 e-mail addresses. Wufoo allows you to make online forms, and although Facebook and other social media platforms won’t put your ad in front of large amounts of people unless you pay, you can still gain some traction by telling people what you’re doing.

There’s also freelance platforms like Fiverr, Elance, and Upwork that have quality freelancers willing to help with logo and web design, and other service for cheap. You could get a logo made for $5!

9. Barter

Don’t have any money? Offer to barter your services in exchange for somebody else’s. There aren’t many small business owners that aren’t looking for ways to get quality services for little or no cost. What you have, they want, and they’re willing to trade for it.

10. Hustle!

Finally, go into your business endeavor with a hustling mindset. Be ready to do anything legal and ethical to get your business off the ground. Don’t like cold calling? Do it anyway? Not a graphic designer? You can find templates online for just about anything. Don’t want to do any free work? It might be worth it to get your name out there. If you don’t have the money to pay for services, you have to do them or find somebody who can and will do it for free.

Tips To Reduce Attorney Fees for Your Business

Whether you are just starting a business and need to form an entity, have an existing business and are negotiating contracts with third parties or are in the process of selling your business, an attorney will undoubtedly play a critical role. It’s important to keep in mind, however, as vital as an attorney’s advice is in these situations, it doesn’t mean you have to pay an arm and a leg for it. Set forth below are three strategies to minimize attorney fees and stay within your budget:

1. Know What You Need

The first step to ensuring you receive quality legal services for an affordable fee is to know exactly what you need from your lawyer. Prior to seeking out a lawyer, write down any questions you would like to ask and take notes of your situation. Will you need help with specific documentation or just need more general legal advice? The more organized you are before you speak with a lawyer, the better off you’ll be.

2. Negotiate Fixed Fees

Small business owners are particularly sensitive to costs associated with hiring counsel when they have a legal need. For this reason, business owners should negotiate fixed fees for their transactional needs rather than paying an attorney on an hourly basis. This is because with fixed fees both the client and attorney are very clear on what the intended objectives of the engagement are. An experienced attorney will know what needs to be done and how much time they will likely spend on the matter and will be able to (more or less) accurately price it upfront.

Sometimes attorneys are resistant to provide fixed fees on the theory that a matter is too complicated to price it up front, say for instance, when purchasing a business. If you do receive pushback, break down the matter into discrete tasks. You could agree to pay (i) a fixed-fee for initial legal due diligence, (ii) a second fixed-fee for the initial drafting of the purchase and sale agreement, and (iii) another fixed-fee for revisions, negotiations and finalization of the agreement. Structuring attorney fees this way ensures that you have control over your costs and clearly defines the scope and involvement of the attorney throughout the process.

With hourly rates, on the other hand, even the most well intentioned attorneys could be inaccurate with their time-keeping, which may ultimately result in unexpected costs for the client. Take for example an attorney that charges $300 per hour and bills for 10 hours of work, for a total of $3,000 at the end of the engagement. If the attorney billed in increments of 6 minutes (which is customary) and is off by 6 minutes in tracking for each hour spent, that would mean an additional hour’s worth of work (or $300.00 in this example) is charged without any actual value in return. Simply put, inaccurate timekeeping can add up if you are on a budget. That said, if you are unable to negotiate a fixed-fee arrangement, you should request that the fee based on the hourly rate is capped at a set amount so that you at least have a sense of the outside cost.

3. Using Legal Forms

One method small businesses often utilize to save on costs is downloading a legal form and filling in the blanks. This certainly will reduce your legal costs since the business owner is deciding to forgo counsel. While it is true that most forms contain “standard” or “boilerplate” provisions, it is the non-standard provisions that really require an attorney’s attention. Instead of just using a stock document form without any modification, a better approach would be to use the legal form as a starting point and have an attorney tailor the form to your particular needs. This should save you significant fees as the attorney can concentrate on the customization and reworking of deficient provisions in the “standard” form rather than starting from scratch.